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Panasonic LUMIX DMC-G1 Review

Review Summary
Reader Score: 7.38 (out of 10)
Hands-on Preview (Summary): "Panasonic's stated reasons for introducing Micro Four Thirds are simple; to produce smaller cameras that act more like compact DSCs whilst offering the quality and versatility of a DLSR - and in doing so to convert some of the millions of compact camera buyers who - according to research - are put off digital SLRs by the bulk, complexity and lack of user-friendliness. ...

Where the G1 - and Micro Four Thirds - has the edge is that there has never been a wider gap between the image quality offered by compact cameras and SLRs. By offering a camera that works and handles like a compact (Panasonic FZ users will feel right at home) but produces output a lot more like an SLR, Micro Four Thirds has carved out a potentially lucrative niche for itself in a market crying out for innovation.

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Other Reviews For This Model

Web Site Review Score Date Added Go To Review
Digital Camera Info 9.40  11-12-08 Read Full Review
Review (Summary): "Panasonic is first out of the gate with a product based on the Micro Four Thirds format, the intriguing Lumix G1. This 12-megapixel camera just started shipping, priced at $800 with a 14-45mm lens (equivalent to 28-90mm on a 35mm camera). It became clear a few months ago, when we shot with a pre-production G1 at the Photokina trade show, that Panasonic had indeed cleared the most important hurdle to making Micro Four Thirds work: the auto focus system is plenty fast enough for most shooting situations. ...

... Panasonic has delivered precisely what they promised with this model, and that's saying something for the first camera in a new format. On the other hand, $800 is a lot of money for a camera that by most measures performs on par with conventional SLRs, but certainly doesn't surpass them, and can't match the extensive array of lenses available in more established formats. ..."

Web Site Review Score Date Added Go To Review
DPReview 9.00  01-19-09 Read Full Review
Review (Summary): "... Panasonic's stated reasons for introducing Micro Four Thirds are simple; to produce smaller cameras that act more like compact DSCs whilst offering the quality and versatility of a DSLR - and in doing so to convert some of the millions of compact camera buyers who - according to research - are put off digital SLRs by the bulk. ...

By offering a camera that works and handles like a compact (Panasonic FZ users will feel right at home) but produces output a lot more like an SLR, Micro Four Thirds has carved out a potentially lucrative niche for itself in a market crying out for innovation. ..."

Web Site Review Score Date Added Go To Review
Imaging-Resource 8.75  11-13-08 Read Full Review
Review (Summary): "The new non-SLR digital camera uses an interchangeable lens design that fulfills the size promise of Micro Four Thirds, besting the current world's smallest digital SLR, and almost matching it for weight as well. In this compact body, the Panasonic G1 fits in a 12.1 megapixel image sensor, 60 frames-per-second electronic viewfinder with 800x600 gapless pixel resolution, a 3.0-inch tilt/swivel LCD display, and three frames-per-second shooting. ...

... Panasonic has hit on a good combination that makes us appreciate the original mission of Four Thirds, which was to produce smaller cameras and smaller optics while achieving higher optical quality. And they did it with style, giving the Panasonic G1 a soft, almost organic feeling, thanks to the rubber coating on most of the body. ..."

Web Site Review Score Date Added Go To Review
Trusted Reviews 8.75  01-22-09 Read Full Review
Review (Summary): "What Panasonic has done with the G1 is to re-think the insides of the camera. They've got rid of that bulky, heavy and noisy reflex mirror, and with it the optical viewfinder, and replaced it with a simple system like the insides of a digital compact, with an electronic viewfinder and live LCD monitor. However they've kept the large DSLR sensor; the G1 uses the same size Four Thirds sensor as the Olympus E-system and the L10 DSLR. ...

... Typically of Four-Thirds sensors, dynamic range could be a bit better, but shooting in Raw mode allows a lot of shadow detail to be recovered from high-contrast shots without introducing too much image noise. In fact the G1's noise handling is the most pleasant surprise. ..."

Web Site Review Score Date Added Go To Review
Luminous-Landscape 8.50  12-01-08 Read Full Review
Review (Summary): "Announced in mid-year 2008, this offshoot of the original Four Thirds format appears intended to address the shortcomings of the original format by allowing camera makers to really reduce the size and weight of cameras and lenses. It accomplishes this by firstly retaining the sensor size with its 2X factor. Micro in this instance does not mean that the sensor has shrunk. What has been size reduced is the camera body and especially the lenses, and this has been done through the elimination of the reflex mirror and prism assembly, replacing these with an electronic rather than an optical viewing system. ...

... the image quality possible from the Panasonic G1 is very high. This sensor and lens combination is able to produce detail, contrast and a delicacy of tonality and shading that is as good as anything else I seen recently ..."

Web Site Review Score Date Added Go To Review
DCResource 8.21  09-26-08 Read Full Review
Review (Summary): "The Panasonic Lumix DMC-G1 may look like yet another digital SLR, but it's not. The G1 is the first Micro FourThirds camera, which does away with the mirror and optical viewfinder of a traditional D-SLR. Since there's no mirror box taking up space, this allowed Panasonic to shrink the dimensions of the camera and its lens mount. The result is the smallest camera on the market with interchangeable lenses: the DMC-G1. ...

... The Panasonic Lumix DMC-G1 is the smallest interchangeable lens camera in the world. It may be the first of a totally new design of cameras (Micro FourThirds), but you'd never know it. Panasonic has done a superb job with the G1 in nearly all respects. It produces very good quality photos, offers an unmatched live view shooting experience, and has a nice collection of both automatic and manual controls. ..."

Web Site Review Score Date Added Go To Review
Steves-Digicams 8.00  03-07-09 Read Full Review
Review: Steves-Digicams has posted their review of Panasonic's first Micro Four-Thirds system camera, the DMC-G1. The G1 is a 12.1-megapixel camera that is a dSLR minus the reflex mirror, thus it is officially called an "interchangeable lens" camera, not a dSLR. The advantage of the new design is size. The DMC-G1 weighs just 1.4lbs with lens and battery.

The reviewer gave the DMC-G1 a "highly recommended" for outstanding performance, portability, and features - though does warn of the small selection of lenses that are currently available for this new model.

Web Site Review Score Date Added Go To Review
Photoxels 7.17  12-29-08 Read Full Review
Review (Summary): "The Panasonic Lumix DMC-G1 has turned the DSLR world on its head with the first mirror-less Digital Interchangeable Lens camera that provides pretty much most, if not all, the features serious and advanced photographers have come to expect from a DSLR ...

... the Panasonic G1 is a resounding success as far as the first micro Four Thirds Digital Interchangeable Lens camera is concerned. Not only does it succeed in excellent image quality, very good performance and breadth of advanced features - it does so in a package that is much smaller and lighter than its competitors. ..."

Web Site Review Score Date Added Go To Review
Photography Blog 7.00  11-25-08 Read Full Review
Review (Summary): "Primarily targeted at female and older-generation users, the Panasonic G1 is smaller than a regular digital SLR and offers all the point-and-shoot functionality of a compact, providing a more natural upgrade path for people looking to step-up to the next level. ...

Despite its sky-high price-tag, the Panasonic G1 still makes perfect sense for a lot of photographers. If you want a fantastically well-implemented Live View experience in a small and portable DSLR-like format, with all the image quality, handling and flexibility improvements that that format offers, then the DMC-G1 is the right camera for you. ..."

Web Site Review Score Date Added Go To Review
Digital Outback Photo 6.33  11-21-08 Read Full Review
Review Diary (Summary): "... Panasonic and Olympus realized the need and market for a new standard. Because they wanted to keep the sensor size (smaller than APS-C but much larger than in P&S cameras) and allow for interchangeable lenses. The Micro FourThirds standard was born. Essentially keeping the sensor size of the FourThirds system and removing the need for a mirror box. ...

... Here we are not sure that Micro FourThirds is a clean standard. Panasonic implements its own lens OIS system while Olympus uses anti shake sensors in the camera. At least for the FourThirds system it meant that the Olympus cameras cannot control the OIS of Panasonic/Leica lenses but can use their body anti shake system instead. If you use Olympus lenses (and this is the most complete quality collection so far) on a Panasonic body there won't be any image stabilization at all. Let's see what happens with the lenses for Micro FourThirds cameras. ..."

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